Proton-M Launches BADR-5 Satellite.

International Launch Systems (ILS) launched the BADR-5 (Arabsat-5) Communications satellite aboard a Proton-M rocket. Launch occurred on 3 June 2010 at 3:00 PM Phoenix time. Following the burnout of the first three stages, the Breez-M upper stage began a series of burns at 3:12 PM designed to carry the BADR_5 satellite into a geosynchronous orbit.

Proton-M
Proton-M Breez-M with BADR-5 Satellite
Image Credit: ILS TV
Proton-M Liftoff
Liftoff of the Proton-M Rocket
Image Credit: ILS TV

GOES-P – Launch

GOES-P Decal
GOES-P Mission Decal
Credit: NASA

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GOES-P 24
GOES-P at T-Minus 28
Credit: NASA-TV

The countdown for the GOES-P Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite aboard the Delta IV is at T-minus 30 minutes at 3:33 PM Phoenix time prior to a built in hold.

You can follow along with the launch on NASA-TV.

Patrick Air Force Base has published their Launch Hazard Area warning for the Delta IV launch. We note the $250,000 fine for violating the space.

Weather briefing at 3:40 PM indicates clear skies, winds from 10 to 15 knots at the launch site and no upper atmosphere conditions that would cancel the launch.

GOES-P 24
GOES-P at T-Minus 24
Credit: NASA-TV

GOES-P Mating with Delta
GOES-P Mating with Delta Rocket
Image Credit: NASA

GOES-P is the third in the current series of GOES satellites (GOES N-O-P) and will be commissioned as GOES-15 once in its geostationary orbit. Its designed lifetime is seven years, with fuel for as much as ten years if the lifetime is exceeded. The next generation will be the GOES-R series, scheduled for deployment beginning in 2014.

We are currently at T-minus 10 minutes at 3:53 PM Phoenix time prior to the built in 15 minute hold at T-minus 5 minutes.

At 3:58 PM, the launch director has announced the hold at T-minus 5 minutes. Systems are checking off items required for internal power. Weather has reported that upper levels winds are green for the first ten minutes of the launch window.

L-minus 15 minutes. Launch weight is 733,000 pounds. Total LOX is 45,500 gallons and total LH2 is 120,000 gallons. The GOES-P satellite weighs 7,005 pounds.

Final poll of all systems, prior to resuming the count, will occur at L-minus 10 minutes (4:08 PM Phoenix time).

There are three items not ready, and one red alarm being evaluated, The poll has been suspended. The launch count will not resume until these have been cleared. There is currently no estimate on resumption of the countdown.

Weather now reports upper level winds are red, and the earliest resumption of the launch countdown would be 4:42 PM Phoenix time with launch at 4:47 PM.

GOES-P on hold
GOES-P On Hold
Image Credit: NASA
GOES-P on hold
GOES-P On Hold
Image Credit: NASA
GOES-P on hold
GOES-P On Hold
Image Credit: NASA

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Launch crew is reloading software for upper level wind conditions and targeting a launch somewhere between 4:47 and 4:51 PM Phoenix time.

Latest report shows earliest T-0 at 4:57 PM Phoenix time

The alarms have now been researched. They are all single events with no re-occurrence. Recommendation to remove the flags and that has been confirmed.

L-18 minutes at 4:39. Resuming polling at L-10 minutes. Spacecraft remains on internal power and that is satisfactory.

Weather confirms the upper level winds are green. Go for 4:57 launch.

Polling of all systems prior to resuming the countdown has begun at L-10 minutes. So far all systems are green.

And all systems are green. We are now 7 minutes from launch.

The countdown has resumed.

The Delta IV has gone on internal power. Second stage on internal power. T-minus 4 minutes. Vehicle ordnance is armed (range safety can blow it up). T-minus 3 minutes. T-minus 2. Range Go for launch. T-minus 1.

Launch was successful. Boosters separated. First stage burn complete and second stage ignited at 5 minutes into the flight.

GOES-P T-60 Seconds
GOES-P T-60 Seconds
Image Credit: NASA
GOES-P Delta IV Liftoff
GOES-P and Delta IV Liftoff
Image Credit: NASA
GOES-P Ascent
GOES-P and Delta IV Ascent
Image Credit: NASA
GOES-P 43 Seconds
GOES-P at 43 Seconds
Image Credit: NASA
GOES-P Delta IV Booster Separation
GOES-P Delta IV and Booster Separation
Image Credit: NASA
GOES-P Second Stage Burn
GOES-P and Second Stage Burn
Image Credit: NASA

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The flight has been nominal so far. Second stage shut down slightly before 14 minutes into the flight. The second burn is coming up at 22 minutes into the flight. Ignition, and operation is nominal. The second burn terminated at 27 minutes into the flight. Velocity is 31,000 feet per second. The coast phase will last 3 hours 43 minutes.

Final maneuvers will leave GOES-P in a geostationary orbit 22,236 miles above the Earth.

GOES-P

GOES-P Meteorological Satellite
GOES-P Meteorological Satellite
Image credit: NASA/Honeywell Tech Solutions, C. Meaney

GOES-P, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite is now scheduled for launch on 3 March 2010 at 4:28 PM Phoenix time (6:28 PM EST) Aboard a Delta IV Rocket. NASA-TV will provide launch coverage beginning at 2:00 PM Phoenix time.

The GOES family of satellites provide the familiar satellite images used by local TV news stations for their weather reports. The GOES Imager consists of a five (5) channel radiometer, which records one visible and four infrared bands simultaneously. This provides weather monitoring of rainfall and snowfall, as well as snowfall accumulation. The GOES program provides weather warnings for flash-floods, hail storms, tornadoes and hurricanes. It also will detect ocean and land temperatures, monitor space weather, relay communications and provide search-and-rescue support.

The environmental information gathered by GEOS is used for climate studies and climate prediction models, as well as the detection of ice, snow and glaciers. Land temperatures, crop conditions and forests can be monitored.

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The GOES-P Imagers have improved resolution in the 13 micrometer channel from 8 km to 4 km. The finer spatial resolution allows an improved cloud-top product, height of atmospheric motion vectors and volcanic ash detection (for example, images of the Galeras volcano eruption in Columbia).

Image navigation and registration, power and fuel lifetime capability, monitoring of space weather and solar x-ray imaging, as well as search and rescue and communication services have all improved with the GOES-13 satellites compared to the previous generation.

GOES-P is built by Boeing for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt Maryland, is responsible for technical guidance and project management. NOAA’s Office of Satellite Operations (OSO), has the responsibility for the GOES program.

The Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies at the Space Science & Engineering CenterUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison — is responsible for four major programs connected with GEOS. More information is available at their blog.

GOES-P Imager
GOES-P Imager
Image credit: NOAA

Proton Launches Eutelsat W7

A Russian Proton / Breeze M launch vehicle lifted off from Baikonur at 7:19 AM Phoenix time 24 November. 9 hours and 12 minutes later, the Breeze M released the Eutelsat W7 communications satellite in a Geo Stationary Orbit. International Launch Services (ILS) was responsible for the mission. The 5,627 kg W7 satellite was built by Thales Alenia Space and has a 15 year life expectancy.

Ignition

 

Ignition. Credit: http://www.zenite.nu

Liftoff

 

Liftoff. Credit: http://www.zenite.nu

Intelsat 14 – Atlas V Launch

At 10:33 PM Phoenix time, we have eight (8) minutes and counting until a planned hold at T minus 4 minutes in the launch of the Atlas 5 carrying the Intelsat 14 satellite.

Intelsat 14 - Construction

Intelsat 14 under construction.
Credit: ULA TV

Intelsat 14 on Atlas 5

T minus 8 Minutes.
Credit: ULA TV

Launch is scheduled beginning at 10:50 PM Phoenix time. Weather is satisfactory.

We have a new T minus zero scheduled at 11:15 PM Phoenix time. Weather is green through the window. Extended hold due to reprogramming the flight computer (to take into account balloon data) taking longer than expected.

Weather Balloon Profile

Weather Balloon Profile.
Credit: ULA TV

Wind Shear Aloft

Wind shear aloft.
Credit: ULA TV

And the weather information updates are taking a long time. New launch time is 11:35 PM.

Wind shear aloft is a problem. Flight profile would not be good. A new balloon has been launched, and we are awaiting a new launch time.

And the weather aloft has now pushed the launch back to 11:55 PM Phoenix time. The US Air Force Range has approved the change. It is going to be a late night for all concerned.

Eye Candy Details

Eye Candy Details.
Credit: ULA TV

Details at T minus 4 minutes and holding for weather

More Details, at T minus 4 minutes and holding for weather.
Credit: ULA TV

The latest word from ULA is that “Things are improving with regard to developing a new flight program. They’re going to have one more shot to create a new program if this one doesn’t work, that will take us to the end of the window.”

All of this is based on the changing wind profiles aloft.

Weather aloft has improved. The launch director is polling all systems prior to coming out of the hold.

… and we are GO for LAUNCH!

T minus 3:48

T minus 3:48 and counting.
Credit: ULA TV

Ignition

Ignition.
Credit: ULA TV

Launch

Launch.
Credit: ULA TV

Ascent

Ascent.
Credit: ULA TV

Animation - Centaur Burn

Animation – Centaur Burn.
Credit: ULA TV

Animation - Centaur Burn

Mid Course Correction.
Credit: ULA TV

All systems are go. We are on the way to Geo Stationary Orbit.

Good Night All.

Ariane 5 – 1 October 2009

Arianespace launched an Ariane 5 with two satellites aboard today. Liftoff came on schedule at 2:59 PM Phoenix time. It was early night at the launch site in French Guiana, South America.

From the Arianespace website:

The total lift performance for this upcoming launch is 9,087 kg., which includes 7,905 kg. for the Amazonas 2 and COMSATBw-1 satellites, along with the mass of Ariane 5’s SYLDA dual-payload dispenser and the associated integration hardware.

Riding as the upper payload in Ariane 5’s payload “stack,” Amazonas 2 will be released at 27 minutes into the flight. The satellite weighs approximately 5,500-kg. and will provide a wide range of telecommunications services over its coverage area extending from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego.

Amazonas 2 will be operated from an orbital slot of 61 deg. West, and is to be used by the Spanish-based HISPASAT telecommunications operator for relay capacity over the Americas with its 54 Ku-band transponders and 10 C-band transponders. Based on EADS Astrium’s Eurostar E3000 spacecraft bus, the satellite has a design lifetime of 15 years, with an end-of-life power of 15.3 kW.

COMSATBw-1 has a liftoff mass of about 2,500 kg., and will be deployed from Ariane 5’s lower passenger position at just over 33 minutes into the flight. To be operated from an orbital position of 63 deg. East, this satellite will be a key element in the German Bundeswehr’s (German Armed Forces) concept for network-centric operations.

Prior

7 minutes and counting

ignition

Ignition

Liftoff

Liftoff

Ascent

Ascent

Booster Separation

Booster Separation from Ariane

Booster Separation from the Ground

Booster Separation from the Ground

Secon Stage Coast

Second Stage Burn to GEO

Animation – second stage cutoff on the way to GEO

Image Credit: Screen shots from live coverage at VideoCorner